La Industria Restaurant by Plasma

The idea with La A Industria Restaurant, was to create a unique place in Medellin where food from many countries could meet in a 24 hours service location. The concept was based on the parallels between production plants and factories that work 24/7 (with their aesthetics, materials, textures, colors, typographies, graphics and so on) and the processes involved in the creation of food before it reaches the table.

The budget was also a determinant factor and was established from the beginning of the design and conceptualization processes, so we decided to take advantage of what happens with materials, light and surfaces in the construction and demolition stages, so we could highlight the industrial look with very few resources. Almost every material used was taken fromold factories, demolitions and industrial warehouses, and others, as the case of the container kitchen, was developedfrom scratch. The materials have their natural appearance: metal tubes, plywood, wiring, network hardware, etc..

The tables are numbered and marked with big white numbers over a black finish surface. All the furniture was rescued from the previous restaurant that operated on the premises and recovered fullywith the finishes and colors defined in the color chart of the new brand. The displays and shelves were made fromscaffolding, the bar surface is constructed from cases of wine withpolyester resin, welded steel pipes, bent, polished concreterecovered from deposits. The graphics were mostly hand-painted by street artists.

Concept and design: Plasma Diseno + Juan C. Llano
Project directors: Carlos García + Daniel Mejía
Designers: Daniel Mejía, Carlos García, Juan Camilo Llano, Javier Gómez, Laura Palacio, Clara Cuartas, David Patino, Juan E. Ballesteros.
Production: NODO + Contacto Arquitectura
Client: COIT s.a.s.
Location: Medellín, Colombia

source: plasma4.com

Starbucks Coffee Shop in Tokyo by Kengo Kuma and Associates

There is no need to introduce the coffee company giant Starbucks. What is worth mentioning and what sets them apart from other massive international chains of stores is their attention to the contemporary design trends and their approach to interior solutions. Where other tend to prefer uniformity, Starbucks is willing to step out of it. Recently, after building one of their stores out of shipping containers, they contacted architects of the Kengo Kuma and Associates in order to create something unique for their new Starbucks Coffee Shop in Tokyo, Japan.

The resulting design does not fail to captivate. A three dimensional structure, partially slipping out of the closed space was created utilizing wood as the main material. The wooden planks are stacked onto each other neatly and evenly. One question that will probably remain unanswered – who will be in charge of dusting this intricate sculpture?

photos: inthralld.com

Volare Ristorante by Plasma

A group of Italian-Venezuelan businessmen with a long tradition of culinary and restaurant experience was planning to open their first restaurant in Medellin. The city was chosen in part because of the cultural changes that have been taking place in Colombians second city, and partly because from thefirst moment of their arrival, the city welcomed them and made them feel at home. The aim was to create a space that will transport diners to a corner of Italy where tradition, good food and the warmth of the “Ristorante” dining experience with decades of tradition and transformation could be noticed in every detail.

After some conceptualization and planning meetings in which the client emphasized the importance of literalsconcerning architecture and Italian atmospheres, the design team reached a middle ground in which the essence of traditionremains as protagonist, but it mixes seamlessly withexisting technologies, materials and traditional craftprocesses and contemporary aesthetics.

VOLARE target market from the beginning was the adultcontemporary with a special taste for travel and food experiences, culture, good spirits, friends and unforgettable moments.

Concept and design: Plasma Diseno + Juan C. Llano
Project directors: Carlos García + Daniel Mejía
Designers: Daniel Mejía, Carlos García, Javier Gómez, Laura Palacio, David Patino, Juan E. Ballesteros, Juan Camilo Llano
Production: NODO + Plasma (Clara Cuartas) + Contacto Arquitectura
Client: COIT s.a.s
Location: Medellín, Colombia

source: plasma4.com

La Bohème bar by AVA Architects

The Bar La Boheme is the work of the minds of Portugal-based AVA Architects and can be found on Galeria de Paris in Porto, Portugal. The bar occupies the basement, first floor and mezzanine in a town house in historical part of Porto and was intended to create a new identity of this space. To achieve this effect, walls and ceilings in all three levels were lined in wooden construcion, which defines individual spaces and integrates them together in a meaningful way.

Walls and ceilings between the individual wooden frames were painted black and create a pleasing harmony with the wooden furniture enhanced by black textile fabric. The bar-counter is situated in the entry floor with the largest construction range, with access to the basement showcasing the finest wine or to the mezzanine with further seating spaces. The facade of the house is cased in granite with wooden window and door frames.

photo: arch-times.com

New Social Buildings in Stadium Casablanca

Stadion Casablanca in Zaragoza, Spain was recently extended by new social buildings. The stadion with all of its facilities lies on an area of ten hectares and is not only a sports club – but a social club with more than 25,000 members. Two companies, Cerrejon architects and Magen Arquitectos cooperated together in order to effectively and functionally design the new building to blend in and interconnect it with the existing ones and create outside spaces at the same time. Therefore, the execution was split into two phases.

The architects tackled this challenge and created desirable unique spaces. The facilities can be grouped into two main categories – sports and social. A characteristic trait of the project is its wavy facades, which dynamically envelop the entire buildings. The true highlight of this project is its incorporation of the former spaces and their integration with the central exterior square.

photo: plusmood.com

Pizzeria Capanna by K-studio

Greek architects of the atelier K-Studio have just completed a rustic pizzeria Capanna in the centre of Athens, Greece. During frequent heat waves „the floor to ceiling windows can slide upwards allowing the restaurant to spill out onto the pavement“. The basic concept of this project was to create a space with an specific „italian courtyard“ atmosphere. Therefore, materials such as cement tiles, stucco plaster, travertine stone, blackened steel railings, and characteristic narrow wooden shutters were used. The stove and pizza bar are placed in the volume tiled with the travertine and located in the backside of the restaurant.

Another volume located above it is tiled with the shutters and contains storage facilities, kitchen and sanitary facilities. The volumes are inteconnected by a suspended steel staircase. The floor and an adjacent wall are covered in grey cement tiles which highlight the height of the room. Antique furniture endows the interior with softness and conveys the right atmosphere.

photos: delood.com

LAM Café by a21 Studio

The building of LAM Café, located in Nha Trang, Vietnam, is a clear example of an efficient utilization of daylight in a café that offers tourists and locals a pleasant and calm place where to enjoy their coffee. The inner space of the café is protected by a sizable roof and surrounded by wooden vertical louvers. Authors of the project are architects of a Vietnamese practice a21 Studio. The name – LAM Café hints at its main feature, since LAM means louvers. This construction method was chosen for its low building time. The vertical louvres serve not only to divide the space, but also as an aesthetically pleasing supporting structure. This way, the space is not too closed off but not too public at the same time. It lets natural daylight into the interior and allows for natural air circulation.

photos: blog.gessato.com

Troll Wall Restaurant by Reiulf Ramstad Architects













Reiulf Ramstad Architects won a 2009 competition for designing a restaurant and service centre in Trollveggen, Møre og Romsdal, Norway. The building, which was due to its location dubbed Trollwall, was completed in the summer of 2011. The area is sought after by extreme sports enthusiasts for its tallest vertical rock face in Europe. The restauration is designed to blend into the environment and at the same time retain its uniqueness and identity.

Its trademark is the jagged roof and its whole glass gable walls. Glass and the jagged shapes are complemented by wood, which is lining the rest of the facade. Interior of the main restaurant space, thanks to the use of glass, casts a pristine impression and communicates with the surrounding landscape.

photos: archdezart.com

Studio East Dining

Studio East Dining, the temporary restaurant was designed by Carmody Groarke and came to life on a roof of a multi-storey car park overlooking the site of the London Olympics. Carmody Groarke is a relatively young London practice which has become known mostly with its public projects, for example their 7/7 Memorial in London’s Hyde Park commemorating the victims of the 2005 bombings. As this building was designed as temporary, it is understandable why architects chose the materials used. The interior resembles not a restaurant but the theatre backstage with visible scaffolding, pipes and rough-sawn boards. This striking construction forms the central part of the building which is wrapped in a white coat. Thanks to the white façade the attractive shape of the building becomes apparent. The floor plan looks like chaotically scattered wood logs and does not disturb the surroundings. The large windows are situated on all sides and offer beautiful views of different parts of the city. The interior is dominated by an interesting steel skeleton covered up to a certain height by wooden boards and long tables from the same wood. The result is a very modern space with charming atmosphere.

photos: kuriositas.com