Ronald McDonald Haus, St. Augustin by GRAFT

The McDonald’s Children’s Aid runs 20 Ronald McDonald houses throughout Germany, like the recently opened house in Sankt Augustin, which provide a place of shelter for families while their children are being treated at nearby children’s hospitals. The futuristic building was designed by the GRAFT group of architects. The seemingly curved structural shell with its convincingly pleasant lightness nestles into its surroundings and has found its balance. The heart of the house is the open plan kitchen on the ground floor with a long table which invites guests to eat and talk together.

This is also where a »ramp« starts, off which further areas for communal use are to be found. The hallway with its three sweeping axes called for a precise coordination of lighting to the dynamic succession of rooms. For the basic lighting recessed and surface-mounted versions of Occhio’s Più spotlight series were chosen, the maximum mobility of which follows the different ceiling inclinations optimally and balances these excellently. To give the center of the family house a calming, familiar and private atmosphere LED lights in warm light colors and with best color rendering properties (a CRI of 95) were purposefully coordinated with the different zones. All rooms were equipped with Occhio luminaires and spotlights.

Year of realisation: 2014
Client: McDonald’s Kinderhilfe Stiftung, Munich
Architecture: GRAFT Gesellschaft von Architekten, Berlin
Realisation/building construction: Ed. Züblin AG
Lighting design: GRAFT Gesellschaft von Architekten, Berlin + Occhio projects / Helen Neumann
Architect consulting: Occhio projects / Markus Olesch
Lighting: Più piano, Più alto, Più alto 3d, io, Divo
Photography: Robert Sprang, Munich

IZB Residence Campus at Home hotel by Stark Architekten

The concept of the IZB Residence is unparalleled: Since October 2014 the Campus Tower has housed scientists and business travelers from around the world. It forms the communicative focus of the Martinsried Campus and its special architecture makes it an unmistakable landmark. The solitary 27 meter-high building stands out above the monotony of the functional buildings on the campus, if only because of its height. An elegant seven-story building, whose glass front is embraced by white aluminum strips, rises from a triangular floor plan.

Inside the central theme is flowing space too: the diverse areas of usable space flow into each other on all stories. The lighting concept by Occhio pursues this principle of connection: architecture, interior design and lighting blend thanks to the comprehensive design.

Project: Campus Hotel
Year of realisation: 2014
Client: Fördergesellschaft IZB, Martinsried
Architecture + interior design: Stark Architekten, Munich
Lighting design: Occhio projects / Helen Neumann
Architect consulting: Occhio projects / Andreas Oberrenner
Area (GFA): ca. 2.970 m²

G. House by XYZ Designers






This detached house with a self-contained flat is being built on a plot of approximately 2,000 square metres in a prime residential area of Weinheim (Bergstrasse) for a family of five. The design is for a building that is split into individual volumes and that has two storeys facing Weinbergstrasse in the northeast and three storeys facing the garden in the southwest due to the extreme slope of the plot.

The playful arrangement of the various volumes, characterised by sections that protrude or are set back, makes the 800 square metre house appear smaller and helps to integrate it into the smaller structures in the existing surroundings. On the southwest side the lower storey protrudes far into the garden. Its roof area forms a terrace in front of the living and dining area with a depth of approximately
four metres. The terrace is given a generous extension in the southwest because of the way the building is set back, allowing a pleasantly proportioned outdoor area to be created with a tree in its centre.

The division of the building’s volume is mirrored by its architectural design. The ground floor, which is faced entirely in glass and aluminium, contrasts with the upper level, which is clad in light-coloured natural stone. The façade that faces the street is mostly closed in order to fulfil the client’s wish for protection against uninvited onlookers. On the side facing the garden,
however, the design is open and allows indoor and outdoor areas to merge together.

K.Villa by XYZ designers




The building is located in a residential area of Düsseldorf, in the
‘White Estate’ in Golzheim. This estate was constructed by the
National Socialists in 1935/36 in a period of one and a half years
as a model estate that formed part of the propaganda exhibition
Schaffendes Volk, meaning ‘Productive People’. The estate,
which comprised 95 whitewashed brick houses, formed the
south-easterly limit of the former exhibition grounds and is directly
adjacent to the Rhein River. The Nazis used the estate as a
prime example of the ideal artists’ and workers’ estate according
to National Socialist principles. All the houses were constructed
in accordance with so-called model buildings and their rural village
character was in line with the guidelines of the Gauheimstättenamt
or ‘local homestead department’. As the required
rooms could not be incorporated in the existing building it was
decided to replace the house with a new structure. Despite strict
stipulations for land use it was possible to double the useful area
through corresponding organisation of the layout within the given
building plot. This was achieved with a very simple structure without
any dormer windows or other structures on the roof that could
have been regarded as distracting. Thanks to its formal restraint
the new building integrates well into the surrounding structures
without negating it contemporary character as an example of
21st Century architecture.

Ajando Next Level CRM by Peter Stasek Architects

A very unusual loft has been created in the Mannheim harbor district. The complete ajando team will live and work there starting in January 2013. The internationally renowned architect Peter Stasek and the loftwerk architect office located in Karlsruhe are behind the corporate architecture concept of the loft. It was inspired by the quantum physics of Wheeler, the architecture of Josef M. Hoffmann and, of course, the information expertise of ajando.

Material is not the building material of our world, but rather information. This is not the position maintained by some Internet-addicted, social media nerd, who cannot imagine anything beyond World of Warcraft, Foursquare and Twitter. No, John A. Wheeler, one of the most well known quantum physicists of our time, made this claim. He and his colleagues already discovered decades ago that material is an illusion. In reality, our world is composed of information. With this knowledge in the back of their heads, our team of architects at loftwerk as well as the architect Peter Stasek went to work developing a concept for the ajando loft in the Mannheimer harbor park You might consider such a project impossible. How can you design something so thoroughly material such as a loft in an old industrial building if there is no material at all? But you couldn’t be more wrong! These creative minds recognized the connection: Information is not only the essence of our world, but also the essence of ajando.

And that’s as true as true can be! Real information is only obtained when we combine, visualize and present the right data in the right way. Information that inspires and motivates people. This is a very fundamental core skill at ajando. “The dynamics of this information flow can be seen as the driving element of the complete company,” Peter Stasek explains. Consequently, the architecture office made the data and information flows of ajando visible in our corporate architecture concept. This starts with the layout of the rooms, for example. “The concept for the paths and the room are one and the same” is the motto, which was formulated by the famous Viennese architect Josef M. Hoffmann. “Just like with information, the visitor is to be guided in the most direct way to the place where the reason for his visit is maintained, consulted, processed and forwarded,” according to Mr. Stasek. As a result, the loft from ajando becomes a live cross-media platform in real life with perfect usability. An ajando room is created for social and informative convergence, for dialog and the sharing of ideas.

Even the design of lighting is part of the corporate architecture concept. “The illumination of the corridors, the lobby as well as the open-plan office were designed under the motto “Light as a wave, light as a particle,” our architect Mr. Stasek explains. Single-color, wave-shaped LED strips will illuminate the outer walls draped with textile starting in mid- October. Sound installations will also give them another aesthetic dimension. The brick masonry opposite shines in colored light as a contrast. White snowflakes fall softly and continuously in the half-open stairway shell – a projection of light. “The gliding of these light particles mirrors the information flow at ajando and consequently displays the complete strategy of the company as a binding and never resting element,” Mr. Stasek comments.

Project by (Firm name): ajando Next Level CRM
Client: Ajando GmbH
Location of site: Hafenpark Mannheim, Industriestrasse 35, 68165 Mannheim, Germany
Program: The loft office ajando has a total area of about 750 sqm and comprises of entrance area, lounge area, open space office on the main floor, open space office on the gallery, conference room, 3 director and management offices, sanitary rooms and kitchenette.
Principal designer: Architect Peter Stasek
Design Team: Luana Kroner-Stasek, Dimitrios Ciatipis
Collaborating Architects: Loftwerk Karlsruhe
Area: 750.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Claus Morgenstern
Lighting Design: Licht-Team Speyer
Interior Design Supplier: Raum-Konzepte Sabine, Kümmel OHG

source: stasek.de

House P+G by Architekten Wannenmacher + Möller

This detached house with a self-contained flat is being built on a plot of approximately 2,000 square metres in a prime residential area of Weinheim (Bergstrasse) for a family of five. The design is for a building that is split into individual volumes and that has two storeys facing Weinbergstrasse in the northeast and three storeys facing the garden in the southwest due to the extreme slope of the plot. A detached house, built in 1999, which still exists on the plot, is to be retained and included in the design.

The playful arrangement of the various volumes, characterised by sections that protrude or are set back, makes the 800 square metre house appear smaller and helps to integrate it into the smaller structures in the existing surroundings. On the southwest side the lower storey protrudes so far into the garden that its roof area forms a terrace area in front of the living/dining area on the first floor with a depth of almost 4m. This level is given a generous extension in the southwest because of the way the building is set back, allowing a pleasantly proportioned outdoor area to be created. There is a tree in the centre of this outdoor area, giving it a special atmosphere and also screening it from the existing building that is immediately adjacent to it.

The division of the building’s volume is mirrored by its architectural design. The ground floor, which is faced entirely in glass and aluminium, contrasts with the upper level, which is clad in light-coloured natural stone. The façade that faces the street is mostly closed in order to fulfil the client’s wish for protection against uninvited onlookers. On the side facing the garden, however, the design is open and allows indoor and outdoor areas to merge together.

Construction: 2012
Architect: Architekten Wannenmacher + Möller GmbH
Photographer: Jose Campos

source: wannenmacher-moeller.de

Stefan-Andres school by Harter+Kanzler Architekten

On the site of the Stefan-Andres school in Schweich the school building it self as well as a canteen have been built. At the same time the city of Schweich erected a public centrum. The synergetic effect is that the school canteen and the public room can be joined for an audience up to 500 people.
Characteristic element of the new building is the façade with concrete parts on the ground level underlining the horizontal pattern of the structure. From the street view the building seems to float. Closed façade parts have been cladded with large ALUCOBOND® panels. All metal surfaces show a dark anodized look, optically seeming to be suppressed. Thus the horizontal layout is supported again. Dark metal lamellas create a continuous pattern all around the building, being superimposed by brighter ones (symbolizing different social groups).
The multilayered façade brings different transparency levels, thus creating a diversified image to the beholder

Location: Stefan-Andres-Straße 1, 54338 Schweich, Germany
Owner: : Landkreis Trier-Saarburg
Architect: Harter+Kanzler Architekten Freiburg
Pictures: Olaf Herzog

source: 3AComposites.com

Enlargement National German Library by Gabriele Glöckler

The fourth extension of the German NationalLibrary in Leipzig is bold and unconventional.According to the architect, Gabriele Glöckler:“The concept ‘envelope– cover – contents’translates the function of the building into architecture.“Function creates form”, is the architect’smotto. “The contents are protectedby a compact cover around the repositoryarea. A lighter envelope forms the exteriorshell and connects the separate areas”, sheexplains. “Allusion is made to both Leipzig’smusical tradition and the German Music Archivesby using façade elements in graduatedtones of red to interpret Bach’s GoldbergVariation number four.” The first two annexesstretch out behind the façade of the GermanLibrary, built in 1912 by Oskar Pusch. In1982, however, the GDR, set a dry, windowlesscomplex consisting of five high towersslightly apart from the historic building. Thenew extension now closes this gap and linksthe neo-classical rectangular building, renderedless severe by Viennese art-nouveaunuances, with the book towers to form awhole entity. The new extension means thethree very different building styles now interactwith one another. An overall surface of14.000 square meters now shelters the GermanMusic Archive, previously in Berlin, andthe German Book and Writing Museum. Theenormous surface area is spread over ninefloors, three of which were built underground.Back on the surface, the transparent extensionis truly compelling. The ground floorserves as permanent or special exhibitionspace. Above the vitreous foyer the four mainfloors are clad with a silver envelope made ofALUCOBOND®.

Project: Enlargement National German Library, Leipzig, Germany
Design: Gabriele Glöckler
Planning & Realisation: Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gabriele Glöckler | ZSP Architekten, Germany
Fabricator/Installer: Fa. Aluform, Bad Rappenau, Germany
Fa. Henke, Dresden, Germany
Year of Construction: 2011
Product: ALUCOBOND® Brillant Metallic & Pure White 10
Photos: Gabriele Glöckler – Photographer: Maix Mayer

source: 3AComposites.com

Paläon by Holzer Kobler Architekturen

Paläon is located at the edge of the town of Schöningen and its open-cast lignite mine, lies the site of a remarkable, world-famous Stone-Age find: the Schöningen Spears – the oldest ever hunting weapons used by man. It is now also home to the new and emblematic research and experience centre, visible from far around. The building conveys the location’s
importance as an archaeological site by rising above the natural topography like layered earth. Its futuristic shape stems from the horizontal landscape; and indeed, the building’s volume, ground plan and section are defined by references to the landscape and lines of sight. The slightly offset contours create subtly different internal and external spaces.

Designed with precision and clad with reflective ALUCOBOND®, the volume mirrors the landscape. The large, deeply incised window openings are reminiscent of shadows on the building and underscore the expressive dynamism of the architecture. These same windows frame views of the nearby woods and wild horses and, further afield, the mine and the site of the find. The extended axes of the building stretch out like linear tracks into the landscape, linking up,
synapse-like, with the system of paths in the surrounding parklands.

Project: Paläon – New research and experience centre Schöningen, Germany
Architect: Holzer Kobler Architekturen Berlin, Zürich
pbr AG and Topotek1-landscape architecture
Fabricator: HMF, Hübener + Möws, Jerchel, Germany
Year of Construction: 2013
Product: ALUCOBOND® naturAL Reflect
Photos: Jan Bitter

source: 3AComposites.com

Reflective Monolith by Holzer Kobler Architekturen

Located at the edge of the town of Schöningen and its open-cast lignite mine, lies the site of a remarkable, world-famous Stone-Age find: the Schöningen Spears – the oldest ever hunting weapons used by man. It is now also home to Paläon, a new and emblematic research and experience centre, visible from far around. The building conveys the location’s importance as an archaeological site by rising above the natural topography like layered earth.

Its futuristic shape stems from the horizontal landscape; and indeed, the building’s volume, ground plan and section are defined by references to the landscape and lines of sight. The slightly offset contours create subtly different internal and external spaces. Designed with precision and clad with reflective ALUCOBOND®, the volume mirrors the landscape.

The large, deeply incised window openings are reminiscent of shadows on the building and underscore the expressive dynamism of the architecture. These same windows frame views of the nearby woods and wild horses and, further afield, the mine and the site of the find. The extended axes of the building stretch out like linear tracks into the landscape, linking up, synapse-like, with the system of paths in the surrounding parklands.

Project: Paläon – New research and experience centre Schöningen, Germany
Architect: Holzer Kobler Architekturen Berlin, Zürich
pbr AG and Topotek1-landscape architecture
Fabricator: HMF, Hübener + Möws, Jerchel, Germany
Year of Construction: 2013
Product: ALUCOBOND® naturAL Reflect
Photos: Jan Bitter

Bus station Hamburg by Blunck-Morgen Architekten

A central pedestrian bridge connects the newly built bus station in Hamburg Poppenbüttel with the rapid transit rail link and the park+ride car park. Hamburg’s elevated railway station is the first component in the process of restructuring and catering for disabled access at the local public transport hub Poppenbüttel. The thinking behind the design for the new ensemble was to create
an airborne sculpture.

The hovering wingshaped roof, with its 1800 m²-surface area, is the striking design element in the modernised bus station, and its light almost floating appearance makes a major impact. The flooring comprises only a few materials, which you might say ‘flow’ under the wing and further emphasise the suspended character of the roof. The sail itself is supported by steel
supports. ALUCOBOND® cladding, bent along two axes, merges seamlessly with the membrane surface.

Premises belonging to the Hamburg Elevated Railway are located under the mixture of wing and membrane roof as are toilet facilities, shops, break rooms for the drivers and waiting areas for the passengers. Eight bus bays are located around the island allowing buses to access them independently. The limited capacity of the old bus station, built in 1973, was the crucial
factor in prompting the modernisation.

Less than fifty years ago, only 20 000 passengers passed through Poppenbüttel every day; nowadays that figure has tripled. The bus transfer station has been transformed from a sheltered waiting area in the centre of Poppenbüttel into a flagship of public
transportation and urban planning. The Hamburg Architecture and Engineering Association (AIV e.v Hamburg) has awarded the bus station the title “Building of the Year 2009”. The jury particularly appreciated the lightness and transparency of the new building.

Architects: Blunck-Morgen Architekten Hamburg, WTM Ingenieure Hamburg,Martin Tamke, all Germany
Fabricator: BVG Blechverformungsges. mbH, Schwarzenbek, Germany & Brinkmann, Lemgo Brake, Germany
Construction: Tray Panels
Year of Construction: 2009
Product: ALUCOBOND® pure white 10
Photos: © www.archimages.de

SMA Solar Academy by HHS Planer + Architekten AG

Being world market leader in the fields of inverters, the company SMA Solar was in need of a
training centre in striking distance to the existing facility. The new building was built on stilts on
an existing parking area. Construction and design resulted out of the site’s proximity to the river
Fulda and energetic isolated operation. Large-format integrated photovoltaic elements are acting
as roof and façade.

Thus the building’s envelope consisting of solar panels and ALUCOBOND in
White high-gloss unifies technical demands with the aesthetics of a pending light structure. Material
and construction of wall, roof and soffit are fading. In the upper floor the lobby, training rooms and
building equipment serve as showroom to demonstrate the building technology. The building is
independent of the public energy supply and is working energetically self-sufficient.

Architect: HHS Planer + Architekten AG │ Kassel, Germany

Location: Niestetal │ Germany

Material: ALUCOBOND White high-gloss

Year of Construction: 2010

Construction: Riveted / Screwed

Photos: Constantin Meyer Photographie

source: 3A Composites GmbH

House Heidehof by Alexander Brenner Architekten

The almost triangular shape of this plot with its long street front and an impressive plane tree worthy of protection at the rear necessitated an elongated building running parallel to the road. The expansive, wood-clad garage wall, the layers of garden and pool walls in front of the house and the compact white cube, rising weightlessly above “zebra stripes”, shield the building from the public space on the northeast side.

The entrance level on the ground floor is reached via a small courtyard and a flight of stairs. From this point, the pool in front of the house can be seen on the left. The pool area is not visible from the roadside. The early morning sunlight falling on this water surface is reflected and enters the living area through a window strip at floor level. In the dark, the illuminated pool appears like an abstract picture when viewed from the interior.

The bright entrance hall, which is characterised by a frameless glazing stretching across two storeys, faces onto the garden and the old plane tree. All living spaces – the living area with the dining space and kitchen on the ground floor, as well as the bedrooms, bathrooms and roof garden on the upper floor – offer views of this imposing tree. On the upper floor, a copper-clad unit stretching along the whole of the solid north wall accommodates all objects and functions to be stored. This element forms the backbone of the upper storey.

All building equipment and appliances are concealed behind this or other surfaces to preserve the tranquility and the distinctiveness of the room.

plot size: 1.160 m²
living space: 377 m²
utility space: 130 m²
completion: August 2008
architect: Alexander Brenner Architekten
photo credits: Zooey Braun, Stuttgart

source: alexanderbrenner.de

Wilhelminian Apartment by Berlinrodeo

This apartment is located in Berlin, Germany. The interior design of this apartment is based by the office interior concept.

This apartment is actually designed by Axel Schaefer intended to the order of the young art collector family, which based in Berlin Tiergarten by the river Spree.

In the progress, BERLINRODEO itself is faced by the challenge which appears during the construction. The challenge is for transforming an older apartment into a contemporary space which is difficult enough, besides, the client itself want a plenty of area to accommodate their art collections.

As a result, the showcase perfect balance inside the apartment is created. It respecting the Wilhelminian-era structure whilst simultaneously including unexpected modern luxury features such as an over sized bathtub.

Contemporary taste meets traditional architecture; it can often be a beautiful marriage. While the people enter this apartment, a classical atmosphere is felt inside this building.

It because the support of the interior design itself. The combined of semi-traditional is blending in modern interior design, for the example the roof, bathroom, floor etc.

The roof is decorated with the contemporary gypsum ornament which gives the bright situation. The natural atmosphere come from the apartment floor which is made from a wood with installed in triangular pattern. Very nice!

Inside the bathroom, an attracted eye view is found there, a large bathtub is installed, very unique! While the bathroom walls itself are patterns in various cubical colors.

The bookshelves interior design is big; many of books can storage here. And of course for an art collector, the gallery room also founded inside the apartment.

source: berlinrodeo.com

Tiger and Turtle – Magic Mountain by Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth

„Tiger and Turtle – Magic Mountain“ is the work of art by the German pair Heike Mutter and Ulrich Genth. The impressive 21 metres high sculpture in German Duisburg standing on the top of a hill is a reaction to regional development. Visitors are welcome to walk on the roller-coaster like structure and are rewarded with an impressive view of the landscape from its apex 45 metres above the land level. The dynamic convolution of the structure has become a part of the scenery. Glinting from afar it creates an impression of rapid speed and acceleration. From up close, the view reveals an endless loopy and winding staircase. Even though the visitors are free to walk along the seemingly uninterrupted walkway, their path is halted with an upside-down loop, which poses a physical barrier.

Tiger and Turtle are an reference to the speed and deadlock in the situations of problem solving and changes. The wavy set of stairs symbolises the local land and leads one through a manual rollercoaster experience, but the impassable loop evokes an unpleasant feeling of helpessness. The visitor scales the steep and winding paths of the construction which is perhaps ironically toying with the contrast of the dynamic idea of a rollercoaster and the stasis of the sculpture itself. LED-lighting is integrated into the railing of the whole structure, enabling access in the night as well as highlighting the whole work of art.

Photo: pulson.ru

House R by Roger Christ

House R is a single family house project by Roger Christ. It is situated in a historical build up area in Karlsruhe, Germany. The lowest of its four storeys is underground. The highest is consists of interior spaces and a terrace shrouded in vegetation. Main entrance is situated in the northern part of the house and a side entrance in the eastern part, where the mass of the ground floor partly gives way and creates two sheltered parking spaces. Home office in the entrance area leads to living quarters, in which a central staircase and a personal elevator opens up the rest of the house.

The second floor contains childrens’ bedrooms, bathrooms, toilets and a corridor sitting, optically connected with the residential space. The top floor belongs to parents’ bedroom which includes sanitary facilities unit, a large wardrobe and the terrace. Finally the underground spaces are projected one meter over ground and therefore, the maintenance room, guest room and swimming pool are bathed in the sunlight.
photos: chictip.com

Arche Nebra by Holzer Kobler Architekturen

Arche Nebra is an archeologic centre built as a result of a competition from before 2007. After discovering a 3,600 year old relic – a sky disc made of bronze and inlaid with gold, a need for a new archeologic centre arose. The disc is engraved with a collection of constellations and a symbol of solar barge, representing the daily movement of the sun. Swiss based architects of the Holzer Kobler Architekturen practice commissioned the winning project.

The centre is situated in a picturesque countryside of Wangen, in the Saxony-Anhalt region in Germany. The form of the centre was inspired by the solar barge. The body of the building is covered with yellow anodized aluminium and it appears to levitate above the glass-encased entrance level with a café. The 60-metre-long abstracted ship offers spaces for two exhibition areas and a planetarium.

photos: holzerkobler.ch

Medical Library Oasis by HPP architects

Two years after commencing the construction of a Medical Library for the University of Heinrich Heine and the University Clinic in Dusseldorf, Germany, the building is successfully completed. The library is supposed to bring a novel and fresh impulse to the area and is a part of a project to reorganize an revitalize the whole campus. Authors of the building are the HPP Architects group. The name (Oasis) conjures up a sense of longing and is a clever wordplay at the same time.

The ideological concepts of improving education that stand behind this building form an acronym O.A.S.E. in German. Library is a place, where students and teachers alike spend their time and gain new knowledge, inspiration and socialize. The 38m high construction resembles a capillary system as a symbol of the flow of information. This idea is apparent not only on the outer facade but is reflected dynamically in the interior as well.

photos: plusmood.com