Pe no Monte – Rural Tourism / [i]da arquitectos [video]

Pe no Monte – Rural Tourism from Joao Morgado on Vimeo.

Located on the Alentejo Coast, the Monte Novo da Cruz is a rural property strongly characterized by a gently undulating land with slopes sometimes relevant. The presence of a curtain of high trees along the south-eastern perimeter of the site and a dense vegetation near a south-western stream stand out in the landscape.
In the centre of the property, in a high position, there is an old rural constructionin an advanced state of degradation.

The proposal for the Monte Novo da Cruz seeks to establish a contrast dialogue between the existing and the new building which sometimes merge with each other, creating a smooth transition between the past and the present. This relationship is materialized through two types of intervention, placed at different levels on the ground:
In the upper level, the intervention consists on recovering and expanding the existing building for owners’ house. The planimetric composition is made up by a succession of spaces,which ends with a double height common lounge with a central fireplace.On the north-west side are located the main entrance and supporting spaces intercalated with small garden courtyards for natural lighting and ventilation.On the south-east side, to the contrary, are located the main spaces overlooking the garden and pool.

In the lower level, the intervention results in a new independent building that adapts to the topography of the site and uses the slope of the ground to differentiate the owners’ house of the guestareas. This long volume, half-buried and perpendicular to the line of trees, preserves the scale of the house and reinforces the verticality of vegetation. Its unique façade is characterized both by a wide opening framing vistas of the landscape as well asby a stand-alone pergola reducing the amount of direct sunlight coming inside the rooms and providing privacy for guests.At the level of arrival the building is almost imperceptible to the eye,only a long terrace with seating areas for contemplation of the surrounding nature is visible.

The connection between the two volumes is developed through a central courtyard, the heart of the whole complex.It is from it that is organized the distribution and access to the different parts.

JA House by Filipe Pina + Maria Inês Costa

Located on the north-center of Portugal, the house was meant to combine the rural and the urban lifestyle. The lot is surrounded by different types of constructions, consequence of the informal settlements, characteristics of most Portuguese cities neighbourhoods.
The existent stone ruins, vestige of a traditional house and the lot’s configuration, were the main aspects for the new project. The program requirements, a family house, have led to an almost total land occupation.

The first principle was to separate the new and the old construction, even if they are connected inside. A stone volume represents the existent building; a concrete volume the new one. The second principle was to introduce light in the middle of the house. Two different empty spaces were generated: the entrance, and the heart of the house – the courtyard.

The courtyard and the stairs are the center of the house and its living. These are the key elements for the spatial relationships between the different parts of the house, the interior and the exterior. The program was divided in two levels: the living room, the kitchen and the garage were positioned on the ground floor; the bedrooms and the library at the first floor. The suite was placed in a privileged point – the memory of the old house.

The scale and the site identity were always present on the construction details and material choices: stone, concrete, steel and oak wood. Inside the white and the wood comfort. Outside a granitic and a new concrete mass were sculpted on the same way.

Architectes in charge: Filipe Pina + Maria Inês Costa
Web site: inescostaarq.blogspot.com
Year: 2014
Location: Guarda, Portugal
Area: 260 sqm
Photographs: João Morgado

Casa dos Caseiros by Mário Ferreira + Sara Antunes

This small house is at the entrance of Quinta da Boavista, Mesão Frio in the Douro Valley, set in a dramatic landscape transformed by man over the centuries to produce wine. It houses the caretaker and is the first phase of an intervention that will expand and refurbish the existing buildings for agriculture and tourism.

The house replaces an existing agricultural construction. It is the reinterpretation of a vernacular typology composed of simple volumes set at a right angle to the stone wall of the terraces that shape the landscape. Upon arrival at the estate, the house sits at the entrance, slightly detached but perfectly integrated into the group of constructions that possess a strong homogeneous character. This character is given by the simple white volumes covered with ceramic roof tiles, retaining walls in local stone, wooden trellis and remaining carpentry painted a deep blue.
Still, as much as this building relates directly to this vernacular tradition, in line with the client’s wish and the desire to maintain the fragile balance and consistency of this cultural landscape, it also relates to the modern tradition, providing an openness of interpretation, with a subtle reworking of details which tend to give a more abstract and ambiguous character to the whole.

The spatial organization is simple and compact. The entrance is set back inside a porch, framing the view over the river Douro. Inside, we sought to make the spaces coincide with the outside form, with the simplest possible division and no transitional or circulation spaces. One volume houses the main living space and kitchen, all under the vault of the roof, and the other volume, slightly smaller in scale houses two bedrooms. The bathroom occupies the space left over from the entrance porch and its secret storage space overhead.

Part of the charm of this type of building, as is the case with gatehouses, lies in deliberately adopting a small scale. An effort was made in keeping the edges of the roofs as low as possible, which, in contrast with the height at the centre of the rooms, accentuates their spaciousness despite their small physical size.

Architects: Sara Antunes Mário Ferreira Arquitectos
Location: Mesão Frio, Portugal
Area of the Property: 63 037m2
Area of Construction: 70.4m2
Construction: 2013-2014
Colaboration: Marta Lourenço

Photos © Jose Campos

Loft Three Marias in Lisbon by AVA Architects











The existing context
Conversion and adaptation of interior spaces.
Apartment located at first Floor of a five-storey building, built in 1893.
Floor joist hangers Wood (10×14) with walls of stone masonry.
Height with 3.5m ceilings with plaster stucco with figurative decorations.
Wooden window frames need to intervene on the side of the road and complete replacement of the interior side of the block.
Original wood floor that is in good condition with the exception of areas where circulation is impaired.

Kitchen installed in reduced difficulties in placing numerous appliances area.
Toilet with direct link to the outside located next to the kitchen compartment and dimensions that a narrow and barely functional space.
Besides being the bathroom of support rooms that are opposite the same side.
The apartment has three hits from the common staircase.
Too many doors that become an obstacle to circumvent.

Intervention
We tried to implement a silent solution. Allowing lap times of each intervention compared to the original and that now advocates. A dialogue from a juxtaposition of languages, materials and construction systems. Searched up a functional dialectic, which could give body to existing spaces and their adaptation to new proposals spatial and programmatic functions. Apart from the introduction of new infrastructure for water and sewage, as well as electrical installations, the existing spaces like kitchen, toilet service and the interiors were reconfigured storage.

Photos © Jose Campos Architectural Photographer

DM2 Housing by OODA

One of the most demanding tasks in Porto nowadays is the intervention on the major amount of old and historical buildings of Porto´s downtown. This project is a renovation of a 20th century building to convert to a 17 housing unit for students and young people in general.

The DM2 Building , located in downtown Porto (priority intervention zone ), in the area of protection of the National Museum Soares dos Reis, is dating the nineteenth century and their original composition the property was intended for a single dwelling taking ornamental and construction of the whole intrinsic characteristics of the buildings at the time, both in functional layout as an ornamental and aesthetic .

However, a later change occurred in ¬ late twentieth century, the building has undergone a profound change taking place inside caused by the modication of use required .

The property became divided by several independent floors with features framed in services and trade and lower floors have been completely redesigned and trace assets were hidden in part and / or removed from the particular frames original, wood structure of the floors (now concrete) and traditional skylight at top of stairs . Indeed, the draft D.Manuel intended to rebuild the property , returning the initial function of integral housing, recovering traces of hidden identity, reinterpreting traditional elements and giving the building a new sense of contemporary housing program with a set of typologies ace current market needs .
So Manuel II building as a whole distributes 17 apartments T0 and T1 types, ranging in size between 28sqm and 105sqm, spread over 5 floors and are accompanied by a landscaped patio intended for parking.

The rehabilitation now completed, restores the original residential function, underlines the unique formal and constructive characteristics and adapt to a contemporary urban reality of the city of Oporto .

Name: DM2 Housing
Type: Commission
Size: 1,100 sqm
Client: CONFIDENTIAL
Team: Diogo Brito, Rodrigo Vilas-Boas, Francisco Lencastre, Francisca Santos, LourenÇo Menezes Rodrigues
Location: RUA D.MANUEL II, Porto, Portugal
Status: Built
Date: 2010-2014
Photography: Joao Morgado

source: joaomorgado.com

Haberdasher Sarilhos de Linha by Helder de Carvalho

A haberdashery to rebuild and remodel. The concept begins on how to expose a panoply of small articles,
between sewing thread, wool, fabric and others buttons.
How to display such items?
On a shelf?
What is a shelf?
3 points withhold a plan, and this way the base is formed.
Why not in cloth?
A great variety of shapes and colours want to take it´s place. Between the warm green of nana´s living room,
a plan is assumed transforming into the whitest white!

architect: Helder de Carvalho e Vasco Melo
location: Penafiel, Portugal
projekt: Haberdasher Sarilhos de Linha – Galeria Gabinete by Helder de Carvalho e Vasco Melo
photos: © Jose Campos

source: josecamposphotography.com

Block rehabilitation in Historic Centre of Lagos by Vitor Vilhena

The building is located in the historical center of Lagos, Rua do Jardim, Rua General Alberto da Silveira, Rua Dr.
Júlio Dantas and Travessa da Coroa.

It adjoins the four streets, with fronts built in all the above mentioned streets, forming a quarter.
The existing buildings, were very degraded, without possibility of adaptation.
The complete demolition of existing buildings was authorized by Governmental Departments and the building was
totally reconstructed.

This Multi-Family Housing Building consists of 2 houses with 2 bedrooms and 11 houses with 3 bedrooms, for a
total of 13 houses, spread over 3 floors, still contemplating a basement parking, gym, indoor and outdoor pool.
A single core accesses makes the distribution in outer gallery, promoting the area for residential use.
The facade and interior layout promote the relation of the rooms (living area) with the streets.

Circulations, private and service areas (bedrooms and kitchens) are oriented towards the interior of the building.
Entrance to the building is made via a courtyard promoting a private outdoor use.
The landscape views led to the creation of a leisure platform on the roof with pool and chairs for contemplation of
the Lagos Bay and the urban structure inserted in the historical city-walls.
The basement has an interior- pool, showers, Turkish bath, sauna and gym.
The presented solution was developed as 3 separate volumes, corresponding to different dimensions of
implementation, in order to follow the topography of the streets and control building height.

This volumetric utmost importance in the structuring of different identities, having chosen to take this sectioning
and reinforce it with wedges and distinct window metrics. There are also variations in the window’s protections,
which contributes to the individualization.
The building enjoys a privileged position taking advantage of composing almost an entire quarter, assuming great
importance in the urban landscape.

date of project: 2011
date of completion: 2012
status: built
location: Lagos’ historical centre, Algarve – Portugal
building area: 2605.00 m2
plot area: 879.50 m2
client: Santos da Terra, Real Estate Investments
cost: 390.000 €
program: Rehabilitation of a Quarter in the historic center of Lagos – 13 Houses
architects: Vitor Vilhena, Michael Vieira, Liliana Sequeira, Mario Espinha
photography: João Morgado

source: joaomorgado.com

Mortuary House in Vila Caiz by Raul Sousa Cardoso & Graca Vaz

Integrated in a hybrid residential context which crosses urban and rural references, the mortuary house emerges as a filter between them and a universe of contemplation of the distant mountains.

Bounded by a municipal road, a farmland and the Church of Vila Caiz, the constructed volume results from the confluence between the axes of delimiters ground, framing the landscape and solar orientation.

The materiality of the building integrates and filters the context in which it operates through grilles cover crops in concrete (filter of light and views) granite floors, walls and paneling in conjunction with the whiteness of the walls.

The interior space results mainly from three major interconnection between spaces defined by an atrium and two rooms that can be joined or fragmented depending on the circumstances.

The view of the distant mountains combined with the water from a tank that strategically reflects in the slope of the roof and walls of the mortuary are factors that catalyze an environment of neutrality, silence and introspection.

Raul Sousa Cardoso & Graca Vaz
Location: Vila Caiz, Amarante
Area: 110 m2
Photos: Jose Campos
May 2014

source: josecamposphotography.com

Tagus Linear Park by Topiaris Landscape Architecture

The Tagus Linear Park combines two different typologies of spaces: A single multifunctional area named ‘PRAIA DOS PESCADORES’ (FISHERMEN’S BEACH), set by the riverside within a former sand deposit, and 6 km of PEDESTRIAN TRAILS associated with dirt roads, waterlines banks (streams and drainage ditches), which converge to Praia dos Pescadores, coming from urban and natural areas. The connection between the ‘beach’ and natural areas is made through a 700m long raised wooden path by which a Bird Observatory built from old pallets can be reached.

Tagus Linear Park near Lisbon – Topiaris Landscape Architecture
Project name: Tagus Linear Park
Location: Póvoa de Santa Iria, Portugal
Area: 15 ha
Client: Municipality of Vila Franca de Xira
Completion date: July 2013
Landscape Architecture: Topiaris, landscape architecture
Authors: Luis Ribeiro, Teresa Barao, Catarina Viana
Design Team: Ana Lemos, Elsa Calhau, Joao Oliveira, Rita Salgado, Sara Coelho
Architecture: Atelier Difusor de Arquitectura
Author: Olavo Dias
Design Team: Pedro Santos, Sérgio Marques, António Marciano
INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION WINNER – Concept Phase – 2012

source: joaomorgado.com

House and Ateliers by Cláudia Melo

This house and ateliers for Arts intend to create a complex to work and live rather than just a house.
It was specially designed for the needs of the inhabitants – a couple of artists with a high sense of aesthetic and interest in the the Art as a way of knowledge – and according to the site – a rude landscape with hot dry climate between Castelo Branco town and Spain. The specific site has a small river, land rocks and shallow vegetation with a unique sense of beauty. There are no trees except beside the river and a cliff dominates the site and alows 360º views. The construction is located here.

This complex to work and live in has a center, an open field like a square that organizes all the spaces – interior, exterior and circulations. Funcionally this void is equivalent to a medieval cloyster since is a place between interior and exterior that can be walked in all its extension.

The adjacent spaces are fragmented in blocks according to its funcionality – from domestic to public including circulations. Volumes are distributed from the north to the south and from public to private and first volumes seen from entrance are ateliers , that protect the house. A narrative with aesthetic and functional objectives reveal a code : volumes that correspond to places to live / work in are grey and appeal to stableness due to its finishings made of concrete blocks and steal plate with horizontal lines. On the opposite sense circulations are vibrant and dynamic since they are red, made of steal plates with vertical lines and designed with intricated geometry.
This complementary conjunction of materials and colours reflect the traditional houses of Castelo Branco, where walls are solid, made of grey stone with wooden doors and windows painted red. Red is the best colour to protect interiors from both extreme hot and cold weather due to its cromatic spectrum.

Sustainability is a very important issue and house is organized in two levels to be integrated in the natural landscape. Majority of compartiments face south and are properlly shaded by geometry of balconys and louvres to receive natural light and heat gains in Winter thus avoiding it in Summer. Natural transversal ventilation allows natural cooling of building specially in the summer nights by night cooling. Thermal mass from concrete walls helps creating a heat battery to prevent from excessive solar radiation in Summer and minimizing heat losses from the interior in the Winter. Low coast materials and constructive solutions also express sustainability and architecture without waste.

On the first level the couple´s bedroom has the bathroom integrated on it due to aesthetic, functional and sustainable reasons : bathroom is facing south throw a big window and is separated by the bedroom from large window doors. In Summer, these doors are open and natural ventilation is comming from outside to cool both bedroom and bathroom. In Winter doors close both spaces and a buffer zone is create in the toillet to receive solar radiation from exterior and introducting it into the bedroom by convection.
The rude landscape is now absorbing this new element and owners are living on it and printing their own time and space patterns. The building now belongs to all of them.

location: Castelo Branco, Portugal
size: 538 sqm
conclusion: 2010
architecture: Cláudia Melo
lighting design: Pedro Pinto
engineer: Sílvio Baptista and António Mateus Filipe
construction: Afonso Baptista
fotography: Miguel d´Aguiam

source: claudiamelo-arquitectura.com

Three Cusps Chalet by Tiago do Vale Architects

The “Three Cusps Chalet” is a clear example of the Brazilian influence over Portuguese architecture during the 19th century, though it’s also a singular case in this particular context.

Right as the Dom Frei Caetano Brandão Street was opened, a small palace was being built in the corner with the Cathedral’s square and thanks to large amounts of Brazilian money. It boasted high-ceilings, rich frescos, complex stonework, stucco reliefs and exotic timber carpentry. In deference to such noble spaces, the kitchen, laundry, larders and personnel quarters, which were usually hidden away in basements and attics, were now placed within one contiguous building, of spartan, common construction.
Built according to the devised model of an alpine chalet, so popular in 19th century Brazil (with narrow proportions, tall windows, pitched roofs and decorated eaves), the “Three Cusps Chalet” was that one building.

Due to the confluence of such particular circumstances it’s quite likely the only example of a common, spartan, 19th century building of Brazilian ancestry in Portugal.
Siting at the heart of both the Roman and medieval walls of Braga, a stone’s throw away from Braga’s Cathedral (one of the most historically significant of the Iberian Peninsula) this is a particularly sunny building with two fronts, one facing the street at West and another one, facing a delightful, qualified block interior plaza at East, enjoying natural light all day long.

At the time of our survey, its plan is organized by the staircase (brightened by a skylight), placed at the center of the house and defining two spaces of equal size, East and West, on each of the floors.
The nature of each floor changes from public to private as we climb from the store at the street level to a living room (West) and kitchen (East) at the first floor, with the sleeping quarters on top.
Materials-wise, all of the stonework and the peripheral supportive walls are built with local yellow granite, while the floors and roof are executed with wooden beams with hardwood flooring.

Confronted by both its degrading state and degree of adulteration, and by the interest of its story and typology, the design team took as their mission the recovery the building’s identity, which had been lost in 120 years of small unqualified interventions. The intention was to clarify the building’s spaces and functions while simultaneously making it fit for today’s way of living.
The program asked for the cohabitation of a work studio and a home program. Given the reduced area of the building, the original strategy of hierarchizing spaces by floor was followed. The degree of privacy grows as one climbs the staircase. The stairs also get narrower with each flight of steps, informing the changing nature of the spaces it connects.

A willingness to ensure the utmost transparency throughout the building, allowing light to cross it from front to front and from top to bottom, defined all of the organizational and partitioning strategies resulting in a solution related to a vertical loft.
The design team took advantage of a 1,5 m height difference between the street and the block’s interior plaza to place the working area on the ground level, turing it westward and relating it to the street. Meanwhile, the domestic program relates with the interior plaza and the morning light via a platform that solves the transition between kitchen and exterior. This allows for both spaces to immediately assert quite different personalities and light, even though they are separated by just two flights of stairs.

The staircase geometry, previously closed in 3 of its sides, efficiently filters the visual relations between both programs while still allowing for natural light to seep down from the upper levels and illuminate the working studio.

The second floor was kept for the social program of the house. Refusing the natural tendency for compartmentalizing, the staircase was allowed to define the perimeters of the kitchen and living room, creating an open floor with natural light all day long. Light enters from the kitchen in the morning, from the staircase’s skylight and from the living room in the afternoon.

Climbing the last and narrow flights of stairs we reach the sleeping quarters where the protagonist is the roof, whose structure was kept apparent, though painted white. On the other side of the staircase, which is the organizing element on every floor, there’s a clothing room, backed by a bathroom.

If the visual theme of the house is the white color, methodically repeated on walls, ceilings, carpentry and marble, the clothing room is the surprise at the top of the path towards the private areas of the house. Both the floor and roof structure appear in their natural colors surrounded by closet doors constructed in the same material. It reads as a small wooden box, a counterpoint to the home’s white box and being itself counterpointed by the marble box of the bathroom.

Fitting with the strategy of maximizing light and the explicitness of the spaces, the material and finish choices used in this project were intentionally limited. White color was used for the walls, ceilings and carpentry due to its spacial qualities and lightness. Wood in its natural color is used for the hardwood floors and clothing room due to its warmth and comfort. Portuguese white Estremoz marble, which covers the ground floor, countertops and on the bathrooms and laundry walls and floors, was chosen for its texture, reflectivity and color.

All of the original wood window frames of the main façade were recovered, the roof was remade with the original Marseille tiles over a pine structure and the decorated eave restored to its original glory.

The hardwood floors were remade with southern yellow pine over the original structure and all the surfaces that required waterproofing covered with Portuguese Estremoz marble.
Ground floor window frames were remade in iron, as per the original, but redesigned in order to maximize natural illumination (as on the east façade).

architecture: Tiago do Vale Architects, Portugal
location: Sé, Braga, Portugal
construction: Constantino & Costa
project year: 2012
construction year: 2013
site area: 60 m2
construction area: 165 m2
photography: João Morgado

Exhibition Children’s Illustration by Pedro Cabrito + Isabel Diniz

Ilustrarte 14, Biennial International Exhibition of Children’s Books Illustration
For this Ilustrarte 14, we have crossed illustration for children with the playful and creative dimension of the act of playing, in a solution that explores the formal features of the famous colorful toy blocks, timeless in its simplicity and potential for discovery.
It is noteworthy that the first concept model has been literally assembled using a set of blocks bought at a toy store.

These objects remain recognizable and communicative, extracted from the everyday iconography, transforming banal into an exercise that brings us closer to the creative process of illustrating.
Starting from this basic vocabulary of prismatic elements, we decided to associate a new material – high density foam – with an appealing sensory quality, inducing a tactile experience and a playful interaction, in brief, stimulating imagination and participation.
The 150 illustrations are thus shown in sets of foam blocks provisionally grouped, combined and recombined in a purely recreational logic, extending the graphic game of the illustrations to a volumetric game that transforms space and defies our desire to play.

Exhibition Design: Pedro Cabrito + Isabel Diniz architects
Curators: Ju Godinho, Eduardo Filipe
Graphic Design: Silvadesigners
Constructor: Eurostand
Organization and Production: Ver Pra Ler / EDP Foundation
Location: Museum of Electricity, Central Tejo, Lisbon
Dates: 17th January – 13th April 2014

source: joaomorgado.com

Halffloors by Pedro Brito

The house was built on a central city terrain with 80m2, were i built a house with 277 m2 (useful), an architectural achievement using half-floors! The house has three bedrooms, one dining room, one living room, one office, three exterior accessfull areas (one a complement to a bedroom, other on the dinning/kitchen level and which is made of glass and other is the rooftop where exists a swimming pool) and a two car garage with car lift.

The house is simple… it is organized in a vertical and hierarchical way. The social areas are on the inferior floors and the private areas on the superior levels. To achieve great visual amplitudes and dynamic interconnections between spaces, the interior was structured in half-floors. The width of the plot decided the stair. In fact, it became the heart of the house.

Positioned adjacent to those spaces is a courtyard that together with the half-floor structure induces a vertical continuity, create a gentle horizontal connection. The courtyard affords a sense of depth and expansion to the spaces, allowing for all the floors from the basement to the first to be experienced as one space connected vertically and horizontally.

It’s a minimalist house with a unique design! All interior decoration was specifically designed, from the wardrobe, dressers, kitchen, bedrooms, bathrooms and office furniture. The predominant colors in the house are white and black creating these a unity between the spaces making it very lightweight and “clean”, with the exception of the couch, specifically designed for this house.

Planned and designed taking into account environmental concerns, Halffloors® is a unfamiliar house with Class A + energy certification.

source: halffloors.com

Belas House by Estúdio Urbano

The house is located inside the Belas Clube de Campo, a private condominium, where topography allowed to maximize exterior areas and offer privacy to the users.

The project extends throughout three floors; the first floor comprehends garage, maid room, laundry room and technical area; the second floor comprehends the office, living room, kitchen and bedrooms; the third floor is entirely occupied with the master bedroom.

The tension between the house and garden is obtained through the creation of “balconies” that are intentionaly higher than needed. The same tension was created between the house and the sky through the thick solar shades. Autochthonous vegetation occupies the extensive gardened areas.

Single house at Belas Clube de Campo, Sintra
Time frame – 2009/2012
Architecture team – Estúdio Urbano A.A. Ldª – Alain

Gameiro e Ana Duarte
Engineering team – Pórtico Vertical Ldª – Pedro

Fernandes
Landscape architecture team – Gonçalo Anastácio
Photography: Joao Morgado – Architectural Photography

Program – Habitation
Plot area – 2133m2
Construction area- 587m2
Typology – T4+1
State – Built

source: joaomorgado.com

House of the Arts by FAT

The Casa das Artes (House of the Arts) in Miranda do Corvo expresses the meetingbetween two identities, rural and urban, in a landscape marked by the Lousã Mountains.

The building features a contemporaryand volumetrically expressivelanguage. The sloping roofs establish a dialogue with the geometry of the mountain landscape, in an analogy to the village rooftops. The dynamism achieved through the continuity between façades and roof is accented by a strong red colour, emphasizing its design and highlighting the building through the surrounding landscaped area vegetation.

More than a building, the Casa das Artes pretends to be an iconic landmark, celebrating the place where people meet, where culture and art happens, a space capable of promoting and stimulating creative activity, increasing the population quality of life.

The project was conceived by creating versatile spaces, technically suitable for different kinds of events, in order to serve all segments of the population.
The deployment area was optimized tofavour landscaped spaces, allowing the creation of an amphitheatre for outdoor events, integrated in a garden which is a public space for the village, with several spaces and inviting pathwaysfor leisure.

The building consists of three volumes reflecting different sorts of use: the first one containing the stage areas, the second comprising the audience and foyer, and the third with a cafeteria and a future museum area, which constitute a visually independent volume.

The proposed diversity of accesses for the building attempts to emphasize the characterization of this site as a public space, while allowing the public direct access of specific places, such as the museum area and cafeteria, independently, without passing through the auditorium.

The main entrance is through the foyer. This space may function as exhibition area which can be divided into two by a short flight of stairs. From here depart two paths to an auditorium for nearly 300 people, with a motorized orchestra pit and six technical levels, properly equipped for holding theatre performances, opera, concerts, conferences or lectures.

The cafeteria can operate independently from the rest of the building, or even serve as an entrance point providing access to the auditorium. This space has a covered terrace with a skylight oriented west, channellingsunset light into its interior. The terrace area gives access to a multimedia room. The facade of the museum area is facing the northern part of the garden where one of the main entriesis located and the outdoor amphitheatre.

Client: Municipalityof Miranda do Corvo
Location: Miranda do Corvo, Portugal
Photo credits: “João Morgado – Architecture Photography”
Area: 2.360 sqm
Architect: FAT – Future Architecture Thinking
Project Team:Architect Miguel Correia, Architect Cláudia Campos, Architect SérgioCatita, ArchitectPatríciade Carvalho, Architect Miguel Cabral, Architect Margarida Magro, Architect Sara Gonçalves, Architect Telmo Maia, Architect Gabriel Santos, ArchitectHilárioAbril, Engineer José Pico, Landscape Architect Sara Távora
Builder: TECNORÉM – Engenharia e Construções, S.A.
Year: 2010 /2013
Photograph:João Morgado

source: joaomorgado.com

Controlar Headquarters in Alfena by Adoff.Zurcatnas

Controlar Headquarters in Alfena by Adoff Zurcatnas

What? – Concept / inspiration
In the current context of globalization, based on a process of technical revolution, the development of companies in the field of technological innovation, such as Controlar, has been marked by a physical dematerialisation and smaller requirements in terms of space and scale compared to traditional industry. In this regard, and based on the pre-existence of a large building which serves as a “skin” to maintain, the concept of action is based on dividing the interior space in “boxes” spaced to the existing construction and arranged according to the program and spans in the original facades. This proposal aims to build within the built and add without touching in order to integrate without merging two distinct approaches to architecture, the existing and the new proposal.

Why? – Choices / motivation
The choice of partition of the space and the space between “boxes” and to the “skin” allows the profusion of natural light from the roof and facade into the interior of the nave of the building, allowing illumination of traffic, leisure and working areas. This objective of sustainability has also generated concern about the issue of cooling, which is restrained to the interior of the rooms, restricting the consumption needs to each of the spaces. In this concept of organization through independent “boxes” it is built up an “outdoor space” within the interior of the building, in a logic of gradual dissipation of accessibility, in which the entire infrastructure network is developed so that access for maintenance and change is facilitated.

How? – Materials / products
In order to stand out the “boxes” from the “skin” the whole building was standardized through the use of grey colour, contrasting with the white used in new construction in which the application of materials from the industrial imaginary, such as polycarbonate and metal, assumes a finishing language with the reinterpretation of their natural characteristics in order to achieve a bright space and of easy maintenance due to their reflective and plane surfaces. This concept of sharing space through the use of “boxes” allows its implementation through the reproduction of economic light structures with the development of typified construction details targeting rationalization of construction.

Architecture: Adoff.Zurcatnas Arquitetos Associados
Project name: Controlar Headquarters
Location: Alfena, Valongo
Area: 900m2
Year: 2013

Etnographic Center by AMVC Arquitectos Associados

SITE: A house of wealthy farmers located in the historic core of the village Várzea de Calde, extreme north of Viseu’s district. The house fits into a very interesting group, which comprises a medieval winepress, an oven, wine cellar and a surrounding outdoor space.

PROGRAM | INTERVENTION CONCEPT: The proposal to convert the space into an Ethnographic museum is based on the need to preserve and revitalize a century-old village, fighting urban decharacterization, depopulation and the consequent disappearance of its cultural identity.

Taking into account the factors of local identity, specifically the ethnographic characteristics, is a visible tendency the ruralization of the economic life of the village, which was made over the centuries and preserved in a modus Vivendi that has remained almost unchanged until today, result of a certain distance from urban centers. These aspects are consolidated by customs and collective memory, intending now to gather these elements in a space where they can be seen.

The design intent goes in the way of restructuring these spaces, maintaining, where possible, the memories they bring.
The proposed concept involves patrimonial and cultural revalorization, focusing on the Ethnographic Museum (developed in the main house) an estate composed by agricultural tools, as well as traditional crafts. The idea is based on the re-creation of living and working environments of the population, organizing the space in a contextualized way, always with a precise theme. It is intended to recover the partially ruined medieval mill, which maintains its granite walls in a considerable state of preservation.

In the space that was once the cellar, completely ruined, it is proposed a new construction, more contemporary, consentaneous with the pre-existence. For the adjacent green space, it will serve as support of the different buildings, acting as a unifying bond of the proposal.

Address: Várzea de Calde, Viseu, Portugal
Project: 2004-2005
Construction: 2006-2007
Area: 756 m²

House over Warehouse by Miguel Marcelino

The briefing was to build a three-bedroom house on top of a warehouse built in the 80’s, where part of the roof was made with a flat slab and a small balcony, precisely with that idea of later building the house.

Given the constraints of the existing warehouse, the house shape turns out to be automatically set: a box that rests on the existing structure. The rooms are placed to the east, the toilets to the west, as well as the kitchen, looking to a centennial olive tree. The existing balcony will be maintained and “duplicated” as a shading element. The living room is placed south where its south/east corner is diagonally cut in a way that the balcony could enlarge and offer an outdoor area protected from the sun and rain, overlooking the valley.